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7 Cost-Drivers of a Dredging Project

Posted by Dillon Hogan on November 13, 2018

Dredging projects are complex affairs that involve many components and significant planning before execution. The intricacy of these projects means that pricing is often multifaceted. Here are seven common areas that drive overall costs on a dredging project.

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The Basics of Using Polymers on Dredging Projects

Posted by Dillon Hogan on October 16, 2018

Why Add Polymers?

 

One of the biggest challenges on a dredging project is managing the water that is excavated and transported with the sediment. On hydraulic dredging jobs where sediment and water are pumped through a pipeline as a slurry, water can account for 90+ percent of the volumetric flow. After the slurry reaches the disposal area, the water must be separated from the sediment, collected, and often clarified or treated. This process must happen as fast as the water is being pumped, which for a 12-inch cutterhead dredge could be 5,000 gallons per minute.

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The 4 Basic Steps of a Wetland Restoration

Posted by Dillon Hogan on July 24, 2018

Our experience in wetland habitat restoration began 30 years ago with the Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program (UMRR), the largest restoration program ever undertaken on a major waterway, worldwide.  Since then we have carried out many more restorations along the inland waters of the United States, including restoration after large-scale environmental remediation.  

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The Most Effective Way to Build Sand Covers and Caps

Posted by Nathan Kainz on May 15, 2018

Capping is an integral part of the remediation of a water body. As the benthic community generally lives on the bottom of a lake or river, these micro-organisms are a key piece of the ecological food chain. They are also very sensitive to contaminants, and any level of exposure can greatly reduce their population. Putting a cover, or cap, of clean material such as sand, engineered materials, or stone over the bottom of the waterway can provide the clean environment in which the benthic community can flourish while trace amounts of contaminants are left to safely decompose underneath.

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