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Diver-Assisted Dredging and Capping Used in the Cuyahoga River Improvement Project

Posted by Kimberly Walters on June 15, 2023

The Cuyahoga Improvement Project in Kent, OH, aims to improve future recreation experiences while protecting existing natural resources. The purpose of our work is to remove areas of petroleum-impacted soft sediments that were deposited decades ago from discontinued industrial practices upstream. 

Background on a Burning River

The Cuyahoga River has quite a history: a transportation route; a boundary; an origin for oil, rubber, and steel industries; a power source; and a dumping ground. The river was once 1 of the most polluted in the country. The Cuyahoga has caught fire at least 13 times since the 1860s.

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Brennan Acquires Dredging & Dewatering Division of IAI With Recent Purchase of Assets

Posted by Kimberly Walters on February 07, 2023

February 6, 2023 — Specialty marine contractor J.F. Brennan Company, Inc. (Brennan) recently finalized the asset acquisition of the dredging and dewatering division of Infrastructure Alternatives, Inc. (IAI). The purchase brings dewatering, water treatment, and treatability testing services into the organization for the first time.

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Influential Environmental Restoration: What It Looks Like [VIDEO]

Posted by Sam Crawford, Project Manager on November 29, 2022

Brennan, working under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Chicago District, executed environmental dredging, sampling, capping, and habitat restoration to remediate an Area of Concern near East Chicago, IN. While complex, the objectives were clear: remediate sediment, mitigate oil sheen, and improve the ecological habitat. Successes and lessons learned during this project will influence operations and remediation efforts for the rest of Lake George Canal. 

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Why Getting a Contractor’s Constructability Review Prior to Bid Release Matters

Posted by Derek Armstrong and William Simons on November 16, 2021

Constructability reviews are imperative to project success. They can save you money, reduce the risk of cost escalation, and are often provided pro-bono by a good contractor. When it comes to requesting a contractor's constructability review, timing is important. If the review is performed too late, problems could result, including confusion surrounding the project, loss of significant time and money, and hefty change orders later in the project. The question then is: when is the optimal time to have a contractor perform a constructability review?

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Successful Hydraulic Dredging Relies on Critical Velocity

Posted by Sam Crawford, Project Manager on August 13, 2020

As a leader in inland waterway dredging, J.F. Brennan Company (Brennan) serves as a success story for hydraulically dredging and pumping sediments over long distances and changing elevations. The goal of most dredging projects is to maximize efficiency, which means maximizing the average percent solids in the pipeline. However, there is a fine balance between maximizing percent solids and surpassing critical velocity to transport dredge slurry. Therefore, a dredge operator must understand the importance of critical velocity and how it varies as the material in the dredge cut changes.

Critical velocity, in this case, is the minimum speed at which sediment and water (slurry) must be pumped to prevent the sediment from settling and subsequently plugging the dredge pipeline. Plugging the pipeline is the bane of any dredging operation and one of the few things that will set a dredge operator trembling in their boots. After all, if a pipeline gets plugged, the dredge must shut down, which means the entire project stops.

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River Restoration: Small Dredges Prove Useful in Waterways

Posted by Paul Olander, Senior Project Manager on March 25, 2020

As the sun on the dredging season in the Midwest inland areas began to set, operations were starting to heat up on the east coast for J.F. Brennan Company (Brennan). For a third straight year, Brennan has had the opportunity to procure work in the milder maritime climate throughout New England during the winter months. These months are key for in-water work on the east coast as they provide opportunities to revitalize salt marshes, re-nourish beaches and restore navigation outside of the fish migration and spawning windows. Generally, this work has been undertaken in and near the coastal salt marshes adjacent to the smaller resort communities.

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Most-Searched Blog Topics of 2019

Posted by Kimberly Walters on January 07, 2020

Brennan blog posts were viewed 13,622 times in 2019. Reviewing our most-searched blog topics helps us construct a list of the marine industry's most critical topics and those most pertinent to our company. So, what were the most-searched topics?

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5 Reasons We Customize Our Fleet: Increase ROI with Dredge Sense

Posted by Kimberly Walters on May 13, 2019

Equipment-heavy industries continually push for optimal uptimes. At J.F. Brennan Company, Inc. (Brennan), we’re committed to investing in our equipment not only during the purchasing process, but also during scheduled off-season maintenance. Internally, we coined the term “Brennanize” to refer to the custom alterations our team executes upon acquiring assets as well as our carefully regimented maintenance.

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7 Cost-Drivers of a Dredging Project

Posted by Dillon Hogan on November 13, 2018

Dredging projects are complex and involve many components and significant planning before operation. The intricacy of these projects means that pricing is often multifaceted. Here are seven common areas that drive overall costs on a dredging project.

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The Basics of Using Polymers on Dredging Projects

Posted by Dillon Hogan on October 16, 2018

Why Add Polymers?

 

One of the biggest challenges on a dredging project is managing the water that is excavated and transported with the sediment. On hydraulic dredging jobs where sediment and water are pumped through a pipeline as a slurry, water can account for 90+ percent of the volumetric flow. After the slurry reaches the disposal area, the water must be separated from the sediment, collected, and often clarified or treated. This process must happen as fast as the water is being pumped, which for a 12-inch cutterhead dredge could be 5,000 gallons per minute.

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